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Photo Credit: Secret City Trails

Coming across a group of people staring desperately at the logo of the University Library in the centre of Bratislava’s Old City, an observer might be forgiven for thinking they are lovers of literature admiring one of the country’s most important libraries. But they are more likely to be playing a popular interactive discovery game that takes them around the city and is trying to precisely name a symbol in the library’s logo to move to the next stop on their journey.

Developed by the start-up Secret City Trails in cooperation with local bloggers from the Welcome To Bratislava website, the game for 1-5 people can be accessed at the www.secretcitytrails.com website.

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Photo Credit: Secret City Trails

After making a payment, a link to the game is provided and players can start. No app needs to be downloaded, all that is needed is an internet connection and a mobile phone. The idea behind the game is to show players Bratislava, but not in the same way a traditional guided tour would.

It asks players to identify specific items at landmarks – for instance, what is being held in a person’s hand in a specific statue – or explains historic inscriptions or mosaics on buildings. They are also asked to solve anagrams and look for things in the city they would probably not have known even existed.

Bratislava’s Old Town: the best-kept secrets

See Bratislava’s Old Town from a new perspective and unlock intriguing stories on this self-guided walk. Solve fun location-based riddles and follow mysterious directions to explore the Old Town in an engaging way. Discover surprising Slovak traditions including water and a whip, a hidden prison, fascinating local tales, delicious food recommendations, and amazing historical trivia. This walk across Bratislava sharpens your senses and encourages you to appreciate the most wonderful – and often hidden – details around you.

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Photo Credit: Visit Bratislava

Slovak Kristína Palovičová, co-founder of the start-up behind the game, said it was a way to inspire adults to play games again. “Adults have generally stopped playing games, even though it has been proven that playing games improves productivity, creativity and overall mental health,” she said.

This article was implemented with the financial support of the Ministry of Transport and Construction of the Slovak Republic.

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